Hike your own hike

As I think back upon 2018, the one thing that stands out is the need to hike your own hike (HYOH). There is no one size fits all to hiking. Just as no two trails are the same.

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At the root of it all, HYOH is meant to signify that you don’t need to conform to what everyone else might be doing but simply to focus on your own hiking experience without comparing yourself to others. Of course this doesn’t mean that one should be disrespectful, ignore leave no trace principles or do something dangerous on the trail.

So this is what HYOH means to me.

The miles I put in on a hike are enough for me.

I know how much my body can handle. When other hikers or people push me to go further, I know what’s in my limits. Stretch goals are fun and great….and necessary. However, I’m not less of a hiker or my accomplishment not worthy because I didn’t match someone else’s time or distance. So instead of comparing ourselves to others, it’s important to understand our own bodies and work hard to improve what we can.

The gear I needed wasn’t always the gear I wanted or that everyone had. 

I returned a backpack twice because I was too impatient to wait to get fitted. Lessons learned. I spent forty five minutes working with an outfitter who fit me for shoes. He even showed me the best way to tie them so they weren’t coming undone every other mile on the trail. I could read all the reviews, watch videos, and scroll through influencer feeds. But in the end, I realized being comfortable and familiar with my gear was essential to the hike.

It’s okay to go it alone and it’s okay to not go it alone.

Hiking is such a personal activity. Being one with nature, observing surroundings, gaining mental and physical strength each time on the trail. There is a lot of fulfillment I’ve found personally in solo hiking. At the same time, I learned that there is also something beautiful in a shared experience of the hike. Camaraderie of having another person to stumble over roots and rocks with. Someone to share a summit beer with or simply inspire you to keep on going when your legs ache. For me, I’ll continue to have both solo hikes and partner hikes, and it feels like it gives me the ability to have the best of both worlds.

I still have a responsibility to hike ethically. 

Hike your own hike doesn’t mean I can blaze new trails, throw trash and my worries to the winds or put myself knowingly in danger in the name of individuality. I need to always have the 10 essentials, know the trail I am embarking on and the weather conditions, and also practice leave no trace. And I also have a responsibility as a member of the hiking community to share that knowledge. Whether I volunteer time, money or other resources – it’s important as give back as a way to help maintain our trail systems for generations to come.

At the end of the day, the number of “likes” don’t count.

My hikes are just as meaningful when I don’t share them on social media. There were many times that my hikes didn’t end up with photos shared or tagged. But those were some of my most intimate and favorite hikes. I still bagged those peaks and took in those vistas, even if it was simply myself or just my hiking partner who knew.  It’s easy to go down the rabbit hole of comparison when looking at some of the perfectly curated Instagram feeds out there, and start to feel this inner pressure to somehow get as many likes, followers, etc. When I start feeling that way, I take a step backward to remember why I’m hiking in the first place and the unique message I can share as part of it.

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I didn’t tally up the number of miles I hiked in 2018, but I may end up doing that in the next few days. It would be great to say that I accomplished a certain goal (a mile a day, a hike a week, or some number of miles in my favorite national park), but right now I think I’m just going to let myself focus on my New Years Day hike.

Thank you for following my adventures on the trail. I wish all of you the happiest of New Years.

 

 

4 Tips for Winter Hiking

There are some hikers who put up their boots in the winter, and dream wistfully about springtime when the ground thaws (and the mud dries) enough to hike again. But if you’re like me, you want to be on the trail all four seasons. I came up with 5 tips to keep us on the trail.

#1 Invest in micro-spikes/crampons

While in lower elevations you might be just fine in your boots, you could end up in icy conditions where it’s critical to have traction. I’ve personally been in situations where I would have felt safer with ice skates on and therefore I’m picking up a pair of micro-spikes this year.

#2 Wear layers

I’ve found even in winter time, I start out cold, but quickly warm up on the trail. I like a pair of liners under my gloves so I can take off the bulkier gloves when it gets too hot. Also base layers are essential and I wear both top and bottoms. Another key must have is to throw on my pair of rain pants. They are great protection when for a moderate hike in the snow and come off really easy. They are my go to for winter hikes, especially when temps hover around freezing. If you are in sub-zero conditions, you’ll want and need some temperature appropriate wear.

Here’s a great article on preparing for winter hikes from REI.

#3 Realistic expectations and lots of planning

Depending on where you are hiking, roads might be closed leading to the trail. I’ve found that it’s critical to have a Plan B and C ready, so if my first hike doesn’t pan out I have some alternatives. Also, don’t expect that you’ll put in the same amount of miles as you might during the warmer weather. Changing weather conditions can derail even the best laid plans.

#4 Hydration is still important (The 10 essentials!)

You may not feel as parched as you do on a hot summer day, but staying hydrated is key to regulating your body temperature and avoiding hypothermia as well. Also while you’re making sure that you have enough water for your hike, also look to make sure you have the 10 Essentials.

Comment below with your winter hiking plans!

p.s. For more hiking motivation, subscribe to my Trail Tuesdays series on YouTube and listen in to the weekly Hike podcast.

Reflecting on 2018 and goal setting in 2019

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Finding peace, one trail at a time. 

Goals. goals. goals. As soon as I have one thing checked off my list, there’s three more to add on. December has me thinking a lot about what I’d like to do in 2019, and where I want to take Hike Magazine and podcast.

First of all, it’s been quite a whirlwind. At the start of 2018, neither the magazine or having a podcast was anywhere in my mind.  The only hiking goals I had were to see more mountains and spend more time on the trail.

Circumstances through the year though led me to want to put something out there that I could share with others. And that’s where the magazine came about. I love to photograph while in nature and document time on the trail. I enjoy being able to share that experience. And that’s where the magazine seed started germinating. While there’s a lot of outdoors and backpacking magazines out there, there isn’t really anything that just simply speaks and focuses on experiencing a certain area via hiking. For me, it was essential to start in the Smokies and the communities around that area.

The podcast was another way to venture into the hiking community and collaborating and learning from others who hike and support hikers. I have loved it. I’ve been inspired, enlightened and humbled. And am thankful that I listened to my friend who asked the question of why I hadn’t yet done a podcast. (Challenge accepted!)

In many ways, I feel like the new kid on the block. But that’s not entirely a bad thing. I’m learning as I go and love being exposed to such an amazing group of fellow bloggers, podcasters and hikers. As they say, hike your own hike. And in this case it definitely applies!

I’m pretty excited about what 2019 is going to bring. More content – from the basics to life experiences on the trail. I’m working on building partnerships with like minded people who can share gear reviews, trail tips and some old fashioned conversation. All of that I plan to bring to my listeners.

In 2019, I am also planning on setting some hike experience goals – such as getting out to some new summits and breaking out of my comfort zones  which means hiking new places and conditions. However, I still got lots of love for North Georgia, North Carolina and Tennessee – so expect to see lots of me in those Southern Appalachians mountains.

Today, I recorded a podcast with Kathy Dalton of Go Adventure Mom podcast and we shared some thoughts about how to incorporate getting out with our busy lives and setting goals in 2019, including the 365 Mile Challenge.  That episode will be coming to my podcast on December 29th. Stay tuned for more info here on the blog and my social media.

Readers, now it’s your turn. Tell me what hiking goals you have set for 2019. 

See you on the trail!

~ Lori the Explorer

The evolution of the Hike Podcast

Starting the Hike: Explore | Wander | Live podcast really wasn’t something that I ever thought about doing. In fact, I have been struggling to finish up my Hike Magazine issue after everything seemed to go on creative hold when my focus shifted to my father’s ailing health.  I didn’t even have a podcast app on my phone. But all of that changed when someone very special to me talked about the podcasts that he was listening to. And when he casually added that he was surprised I hadn’t started a podcast. In hindsight that may have been because I tend to start a lot of projects.

However, that’s when it clicked. I wanted to lend my voice to this space in an effort to share both my hiking stories and those with much more interesting ones to tell. Creating isn’t entirely new to me. I had spent some time crafting two minute videos about my hiking adventures which I called the Hiking Bedtime Stories series. They were meant to be fun and to not be taken ultra seriously. I was just sharing my thoughts and scenes I took in on the trail. I realized I enjoyed the creation of content – blogging, vlogging, photo layouts – and bringing it all together.

So a podcast? What would I do when there were no visuals? And so I spent the better part of an afternoon researching how to start a podcast. I downloaded the open source audio software Audacity. I put in an order for an inexpensive microphone. I made a list of all the topics I was interested in as a hiker and someone who wanted to support those who supported the hiking community. I started “cold calling” by sending out emails and direct messages requesting interviews. For the most part, people have been super supportive and willing to share their stories. And if they weren’t interested in going on air, they recommended those who would.

Yes, there were a couple who weren’t interested in taking a chance on someone unestablished. I had to be okay with that. Because after all, this project for me is more about sharing the love of the hike. I’ve been lucky to connect with others with a shared passion for hiking and the outdoors. I’m not really one to spend too much time focused on the closed doors, when there is so much out there ready to explore.

My first two interviews were with hikers who shared some common trails. Both Plug-It In and Danny Bernstein have completed the 900 miler club, which is a challenge within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park to complete all of the official trails. Danny’s interview is up now and Plug-It In’s posts on December 1st. I hope you subscribe and take a listen to both as they share their unique and inspirational experiences with me

I’m learning that interviewing is an art and just as challenging as the mountains I love to hike. There are times I stumble, but like the advice Danny gives me when it comes to taking on a challenge such as the 900 miler – it’s about perseverance. How true that is.

Hearing other peoples hiking stories has led to an even deeper discovery that we find ourselves and happiness in the space between the blazes.

I hope you’ll join me on my podcast adventure. This wouldn’t be possible without having the support of someone who loves me and encourages me to be my best. And during this Thanksgiving Day weekend, that is something I am especially grateful for.

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